Home Subsea Huisman presents cable-lay system for multi-purpose vessels – gallery

Dutch designer and manufacturer of heavy construction equipment Huisman has unveiled a cable-lay system that ensures fast mobilization and demobilization. This development has been spurred by the growing market need for diverse deployment scenarios of multi-purpose vessels (MPVs).

Damen Offshore Carrier (DOC) motion compensated cable laying vessel, developed in collaboration with Huisman; Source: Damen

The Dutch player, dedicated to providing sustainable solutions for the installation of future offshore wind farms and conventional energy production, points out that its fully integrated cable-lay system is designed for the efficient installation of inter-array cables. With modular design and a simple interface, the system allows for a swift (de)mobilization, requiring only four lifts, or optionally even a single lift.

Huisman’s cable-lay system comes with multiple bells and whistles, including spacious work environments on the portside (PS) and starboard (SB) for handling the first and second cable ends, respectively; capacity for handling 30 m cable protection systems (CPS) in a single run; three optional offline CPS buffer positions on both PS and SB; and hydraulically retractable side rollers for swift movement of CPS to the main line.

“The state-of-the-art cable-lay equipment is designed to safeguard product integrity during all stages of installation, by lowering the cable in a safe and controlled manner onto the seabed and facilitating burial at the required depth,” underscored the Dutch firm.

Source: Huisman

The company claims that the modular platform, which enables swift mobilization and demobilization capabilities, can be installed without significant modifications to the vessel. The Dutch player underlines that efficient operations are enabled by a fully mechanized quadrant handling system. The CPS preparation can occur parallel to the cable laying procedure while the CPS storage system efficiently supplies long CPS strings.

Furthermore, the risk of cable failure is minimized with a basket spooling device equipped with an underbender for a controlled landing on cable transport gutters while large-diameter rollers support the cable. The firm explains that sharp edges are protected with wear-resistant material.

“We introduce our modular cable-lay system, tailored for the seamless installation of inter-array cables. Engineered for multi-purpose vessels, our cable-lay system enables you to transition an offshore construction vessel to a dedicated cable-lay vessel within a matter of days, saving more time for getting the job done and less time on logistical complexities,” highlighted Huisman.

Moreover, Huisman also offers the market a motion-compensated cable-lay system, as “a safe and efficient” solution for the installation and repair of inter-array cables, compensating the vertical motion at the chute, stabilizing the catenary, enabling operations in higher sea states and extending operational weather window.

As the modular design ensures that the motion-compensated cable-lay system can be mobilized and demobilized quickly onto PSVs and OSVs, Huisman emphasizes that this makes the system “ideal” for cable repairs or replacements, which need to be carried out throughout the year. The system can be configured for cable repairs and the special features entail extra opening shelters, in which the cable can be repaired.

Huisman’s motion-compensated cable-lay system has been integrated into the Damen Offshore Carrier (DOC), introducing – what the firm deems to be – the world’s first motion-compensated cable-laying vessel (CLV). The two Dutch players offer the market a fully integrated solution specifically tuned to optimizing operability and improving control and accuracy of cable placement. 

“Cable lay operations are very sensitive to the weather conditions. As a result, operations are typically limited to a significant wave height of 1.5-2 meters, resulting in a workability of approximately 65%. This novel CLV solution can stretch the limits of cable laying and operate in sea states with significant wave heights of up to 3.5 m,” outlined Damen.

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